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Review of various IDEs June 1, 2017

Posted by whyyoualwaysryan in Uncategorized.
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  • I very strongly recommend that you have some experience with coding prior to this station. I also recommend that if you have more experience with any specific language, that you use that language in this station. For instance, if you have experience with C++, you should write your hello world program in C++
  • After making a hello world program, don’t make a new one, instead of starting from scratch, play around a little bit with the hello world program. See if you can change the amount of times it displays hello world, see if you can incorporate some level of user input. Play around with a working program before you have to start over again.
  • As with any station even remotely involved with coding: COMMENT YOUR CODE
  • Install IDEs before you plan to start using them, they take a while to install and they can easily take up a full class period, wasting time, and making you very bored. You might consider choosing your IDEs beforehand, and installing the remaining IDEs while you work with the first one
  • Stay focused. It’s very easy to get wrapped up in one single IDE, don’t forget to keep moving (I accidentally wasted all of my time on Game Maker, and then had very little time to work with the other two IDEs)
  • Utilize tutorials, they work much better than forums, and some IDEs might have built in tutorials
  • Although frustrating and intimidating, forums can be rather helpful, even if only to let you figure out what to research. (as in, when you see a forum response which says “the solution to this is just console commands, you now know to research console commands, even if you don’t know what those are and the forum gives a poor explanation of them.
  • Depending on the language, syntax can be vital. Double and triple check not only for typos, but also what the program is supposed to run.
  • If you become really stuck, try “rubber duck” coding. Get a rubber duck (or any item really, a friend could even work if they’re not too busy) and read the code aloud. As you do this, explain what each line of the code does. This can be extremely effective for noticing “idiot mistakes” in logic, or possibly even typos. It sounds silly, but it is surprisingly effective.
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